Monday, September 26, 2016

Do I have Sjogren's? How can I tell?



Do I have Sjogren's?  How can I tell?


TheraLife often get this question from our customers- how do I know  if  I have Sjogrens?
My doctor did all kinds of blood tests that  are negative.  Can you help?

Major Symptoms of Sjogren's   

One of the key hallmark of Sjogren’s is Dry Eyes, Dry Mouth.  Regardless of whether your blood tests ( serology) is positive or negative.

On average, it takes 7 years to diagnose Sjogren’s.

Sjogren’s Syndrome is a condition which is often misdiagnosed or undiagnosed.

Awareness and recognition of Sjogren's syndrome is important.

Sjogren's Statistics

We estimate 1 to 4 million people have the disease. Of this group, 90% are women. Sjogren's syndrome can occur at any age, but it usually is diagnosed after age 40 and can affect people of all races and ethnic backgrounds. Sjogren's syndrome is rare in children, but it can occur.

What is Sjogren's


Sjogrens Syndrome is an autoimmune disease where one’s own immune system  is attacking own body tissue, specifically mucus related  tissues such as eyes, mouth, lungs, vaginal areas, and connective tissues resulting in inflammation of the glands and body.

Many women have the disease but do not recognize the symptoms which are similar to those of other conditions including menopause.

Symptoms Of  Sjogren's Syndrome

  • Dry mouth
  • Dry eyes
  • hoarseness
  • vaginal dryness
  • dry skin
  • fatigue

Primary Vs. Secondary Sjogren's Syndrome

  1. Primary Sjogren’s
    When only gland inflammation and resulting dry eyes and mouth are involved the disease is known as primary Sjogren's syndrome. There can also be extraglandular problems associated with Sjogren's syndrome which may include:
  • Joint pain
  • Raunaud’s
  • lung inflammation
  • enlarged lymph nodes
  • vasculitis
  • kidney,, nerve, or muscle disease- Pheripheral neuropathy – burning tingling or numbing sensation of hands and feet.
2.  Secondary Sjogren’s
  • The disease is known as secondary Sjogren's syndrome when the gland inflammation exists in combination with another connective tissue disease or autoimmune disease such as:
  • Lupus
  • Scleroderma
  • rheumatoid arthritis

Diagnosis of Sjogren's Syndrome

The diagnosis of Sjogren’s Syndrome is based largely on the detection of dry eyes and mouth. Helpful diagnostic tools that serve in making the diagnosis include:
  • Schirmer’s test  for dry eyes
  • radiologic salivary scans
  • salivary flow testing
  • biopsy of salivary glands
  • blood tests
  • Sjogren's questionnaire

Treatment of Sjogren's Syndrome

Sjogren’s patients are often on potent immunosuppressive drugs that has tremendous side effects.

TheraLife offers an alternative natural therapy that relieves multiple symptoms and make Sjogren’s more manageable.

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A person suffering with symptoms which may be due to Sjogren's syndrome must be aware of the need for medical assessment and the treatments available. Ignoring Sjogren's syndrome symptoms prolongs the suffering. Awareness leads to available help.

Complications linked to Sjogren's syndrome

Patients with Sjogren's syndrome have a 44 times higher risk of developing non-Hodgkin's lymphoma than others.

People with Sjogren's syndrome have a higher risk of developing yeast infections, dental cavities, and having vision problems. Less commonly, there is also a risk of inflammation that may cause bronchitis, pneumonia and other lung problems that may lead to kidney function problems, which in turn raise the risk of hepatitis or cirrhosis in the liver. In rare cases a pregnant woman with Sjogren's syndrome may give birth to a baby with heart problems. There is also a higher risk that the baby may develop lupus.


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email: info@theralife.com
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Referances
http://www.sjogrensworld.org/sjogrensdefn.htm
http://arthritis.about.com/od/sjogrens/a/sjogrenssynd.htm
http://www.medicalnewstoday.com/articles/233747.php

Monday, September 5, 2016

Dry Eye Syndrome and It's Impact on the Workplace



Dry Eye Syndrome and It's Impact on the Workplace


Dry eye syndrome is a multifactorial condition characterized by an unstable tear film resulting in symptoms of eye discomfort and visual disturbances. Quality of life studies have shown that dry eye syndrome has the potential to have a detrimental impact on patients’ daily living activities, with a significant proportion of people self-treating with over-the-counter (OTC) dry eye products, especially eye drops. What is not well documented is how dry eye syndrome influences the work place.

New Research Study Shows Impact of Dry Eyes on the Workplace - Loss of Productivity.

Here is an abstract from this clinical study.  
 
The purpose of this non-interventional, cross sectional, prospective study was to assess the effect of dry eye disease on work productivity and performance of non–work-related activities, and people's satisfaction with OTC dry eye treatments. The study included 158 consecutive symptomatic dry eye patients at a number of clinical centers who were asked to complete Work Productivity and Activity Impairment and Ocular SurfaceDisease Index  questionnaires and undergo standard dry eye diagnostic testing (Schirmer, tear break up time, corneal and conjunctival staining). Use of OTC dry eye medication, and satisfaction with OTC medication and symptom relief were also assessed.
 
The results indicate that dry eye syndrome did not contribute to absenteeism but did negatively affect work productivity and non-job related daily activities. The negative workplace performance effect experienced by people with dry eyes was significant (approximately 29%) and correlated with their self-assessment of dry eye symptoms but not clinical assessment. These results reinforce personal clinical experience that people with dry eyes tend to present with symptoms with few clinical signs to explain the symptoms.  Another words tests for dry eyes were often negative.  


The study did not address the number of people with dry eyes having to leave their jobs due to dry eyes.

The study didn't specifically address which occupations were most likely to be affected, but intuitively those jobs that require intensive computer usage in air-conditioned/heated work-spaces would be most likely. A majority of the study participants were utilizing OTC dry eye products and interestingly their opinion of the effectiveness of such products was more positive than their reported assessment of dry eye relief provided by the products.  Another words, people with dry eyes want to believe over the counter eye drops will work, but the actual dry eye relief by using eye drops was low.  

This is consistent with TheraLife 's assessment that for a high percentage of dry eyes, eye drops don't work.


This study was pubulished in the July issue of Ocular Surface News

TheraLife Can Help
Learn how TheralIfe Eye works.  Click here



Restore and Revive your tear function with TheraLife Eye capsules, no more drops.  

All Natural!  Satisfaction Guaranteed. 
Doctor's Recommended, Clinically proven to work for 80% of first time users.  









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Monday, August 29, 2016

Risk Factors for Developing Dry Eye Syndrome

 

Risk Factor for the Developing Dry Eye Syndrome

We all know the discomfort and often how life changing chronic dry eye syndromes can be.
You tried everything, drops, punctal plugs, prescription eye drops, nothing seems to help.  Let's see if you have these risk factors that causes dry eyes. 

1. Women in maturity:

Menopause women who receive hormone replacement therapy are at higher risk. Post menopausal women who use hormone replacement, especially estrogen, have a higher prevalence of dry eye syndrome compared with those who have never used hormone replacement therapy. In general both menopausal and post menopausal women tend to have dry eye symptoms; this is because hormone balance is important in tear production.

2. Arthritis and smoking


3. Medications -

Medications such as diuretics (to lower high blood pressure) , antidepressants, antihistamines, anticholinergics, and systemic retinoids like Accutane can increase the risk of developing dry eye syndrome

4. Environmental factors,

Such as reduced humidity and increased wind, drafts, air conditioning, or heating may worsen the ocular discomfort of patients with dry eye. Exogenous irritants and allergens, although not believed to be causative of dry eye, can certainly increase the symptoms of dry eyes in people, as can extended visual tasking during computer use, television watching, and prolonged reading.


5. LASIK or PRK Surgery:

Following refractive surgery such as laser-assisted in situ keratomileusis (LASIK) or photorefractive keratectomy (PRK), patients for several months may experience significant dry eye due to the severing of the corneal nerves during surgery.

6. Systemic Diseases

Sjogrens, Blepharitis, Lymphoma, Viral Infections, AIDS …

Dry eye-associated systemic diseases include Sjögren's syndrome, where inflammation of the lacrimal gland leads to tear-production deficiency, and rosacea, which is associated with posterior blepharitis with increased tear evaporation. Aqueous tear deficiency may develop in systemic pathologies such as lymphoma, sarcoidosis, hemochromatosis, and amyloidosis. Dry eye may likewise develop in patients with systemic viral infections and AIDS. Lacrimal gland swelling, dry eye, and Sjögren’s syndrome have been associated with Epstein-Barr virus infections15 and decreased tear production, reduced tear volume, and reduced tear lactoferrin concentrations have been seen in patients with hepatitis C. Neuromuscular disorders that affect the patient’s blink (e.g., Parkinson disease, Bell palsy) can lead to dry eye syndrome as can localized findings such as eyelid malposition, lagophthalmos, and blepharitis.

7. Cancer Treatments

Radiation, Transplantation, localized trauma, including orbital surgery, radiation, and injury, may also cause dry eye.
You can see from all the research into the risk factors of dry eye disease that we need to go beyond just dispensing some artificial tear to people with dry eyes.  Lifestyle can have a major impact in  underlying issues our patients may have. It is the first step to insure success in DED treatment.
Excerts from Optometric Management – Jan 2011 Issue by Dr Ernest Bowling OD and Gregg Russell OD



How can TheraLife Help?

TheraLife has a spectrum of products that deal with these dry eye disorders including:

  • TheraLife Eye – for chronic dry eye: Web link
  • TheraLife Menopausal Support – for hormone balance: Web link
  • TheraLife Autoimmune Dry Eye formula – for Sjogren’s and more: Web link
  • TheraLife Omega 3 Fish Oil – to increase dry eye relief when used in combination with TheraLife Eye and TheraLife Autoimmune. click here

Call and talk to a doctor toll free 1-877-917-1989
International (650) 949-6080
Send inquiries to: info@theralife.com
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Thursday, August 25, 2016

New Treatment for Sjogren's Disease and Dry Eyes


New Treatment for Sjogren's Disease and Dry Eyes


Sjogren's Syndrome and Chronic Dry Eye Syndrome- Causes, Symptoms and Treatments

Sjogren’s syndrome is a particular form of autoimmune disease where one’s body defense mechanism (immune system) attacks one’s own tissue or organs.  In the case of Sjogren’s syndrome, it attaches the organs that produce moisture (mucous membranes).  The most common symptoms are dry eye and dry mouth.  It can also affect other organs such as throat, lungs, kidney, liver, pancreas, central nervous system, gastrointestinal systems, joints, and blood vessels. 

Other autoimmune diseases can also result in chronic dry eye including Rheumatoid Arthritis, Lupus, Grave’s Disease, Chrone’s Disease, and Fibromyalgia.  Diagnosis for Sjorgren’s syndrome can be difficult due to similarities of disease symptoms.

Dry Eyes Challenges in Sjogren's Disease


For many, Sjogren’s syndrome related dry eye often results in eye ulcers, corneal abrasion, extreme fatigue and a great deal of pain.  Some people with Sjögren's syndrome also have other autoimmune disorders, such as rheumatoid arthritis, systemic lupus erythematosus, systemic sclerosis, vasculitis, mixed connective tissue disease, Hashimoto's thyroiditis, primary biliary cirrhosis, and chronic autoimmune hepatitis..  It is a debilitating disease for as many as 4 million Americans.  Most Sjorgren’s patients are women.

Conventional Treatment for Sjogren's

Conventional therapy for Sjorgren’s chronic dry eye often includes eye drops – which make dry eye worse.  Prescription drugs often include steroids which cannot be used continuously over long periods of time due to its toxic effects to liver and kidney.  

How TheraLife Autoimmune Formula Works

TheraLife Autoimmune Formula is a natural way to provide relief for both chronic dry eye and Sjorgren’s Syndrome.  It works by:

1. Intracellular stimulation of tear glands (mybomian, lacrimal) to promote one’s glands to secret its own tears naturally and overcome issues with poor micro-circulation and membrane permeability. This is the key factor in Chronic Dry Eye Syndrome.

2.  Natural ingredients that act as an immune suppressant (immune modulator)

3.  Improve performance, endurance and energy levels.
4. No side effects of prescription drugs
5. Provides continuous daily support. 

Is this story helpful?  Forward it to your friends.  





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Friday, August 19, 2016

Dry Eyes and LASIK - Causes, Symptoms and Treatments

Lasik Dry Eyes- Causes, Symptoms and Treatments


LASIK Dry Eyes

Does this story sound familiar?  You finally decide to get LASIK so that you don’t have to wear contact lenses or glasses.  You are so excited to see the great results only to find out that once the procedure is finished, you have developed a pretty bad case of dry eyes.  Your doctor gave you over the counter eye drops and prescription eye drops to reduce inflammation.  You may have tried punctal plugs to back up tears, used thick gels at night to prevent tear evaporation and warm compresses to stimulate eye production. You might have even tried eye vitamins that are suppose to thicken your tears.  Nothing has helped!  Your eyes are still dry, irritated, red, tired and it is affecting your work.  What to do?


TheraLife® Dry Eye Enhanced can Help!  Read on! 


Dry eyes are the most often reported complication of LASIK and other refractive surgery procedures. For most refractive surgery patients, their dry eye conditions are not significant enough or long enough to cause much difficulty. Unfortunately, some LASIK patients develop long-term dry eye conditions that are very debilitating.

Why does LASIK surgery cause dry eyes? During the LASIK procedure, corneal nerve tissue and tear gland cells may be damaged. This is normal and expected during LASIK. However, this damage and interruption of nerve impulses to the tear glands can cause dry eye conditions.

Why TheraLife Dry Eye Enhanced?


TheraLife® Dry Eye Enhanced Formula works by intra-cellular stimulation of  tear glands to secrete sustainable tears naturally.  The benefits of TheraLife® Dry Eye Enhanced are:
  • Accelerates and aids healing of damaged corneal nerves and tissue
  • Strong anti-inflammatory agents to reduce swelling and dry eye discomfort
  • Stimulates tear glands to produce balanced natural tears

The use of TheraLife® Dry Eye Enhanced Formula ® increases normal tear production and provides continuous support after LASIK surgery to promote tissue repair and helps restore normal tear film to ensure a successful outcome.

With the success of TheraLife® Eye, many doctors are now recommending TheraLife Eye Enhanced for post LASIK dry eye relief. 








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Toll free- 1-877-917-1989. 

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Wednesday, August 17, 2016

Dry Eye Relief When Drops Don't Work


Dry Eye Relief When Drops Don't Work



Eye Drops are Not Enough - Risk Factors for Chronic Dry Eye Syndrome. What you have to lose when not treated.
There are numerous risk factors for dry eye syndrome:  include but not limited to:

1.      Women in menopause

Menopause women who receive hormone replacement therapy are at higher risk.  Postmenopausal women who use hormone replacement therapy, especially estrogen, have a higher prevalence of dry eye syndrome compared with those who have never used hormone replacement therapy.  In clinical experience, both menopausal and postmenopausal women tend to have dry eye symptoms; this can be attributed to the significant decrease of tear production around the sixth decade of life in women.4  Similarly, it has been noted that women with primary ovarian failure develop clinically significant dry eye syndrome.
 

3.      Medications - 


Medications such as diuretics (to lower high blood pressure) , antidepressants, antihistamines, anticholinergics, and systemic retinoids like Accutane
 can increase the risk of developing dry eye syndrome.
 
4.      Environmental factors,

Such as reduced humidity and increased wind, drafts, air conditioning, or heating may worsen the ocular discomfort of patients with dry eye.  Exogenous irritants and allergens, although not believed to be causative of dry eye, can certainly increase the symptoms of dry eye syndrome in patients, as can extended visual tasking during computer use, television watching, and prolonged reading.
 
5.      LASIK or PRK Surgery:

Following refractive surgery such as laser-assisted in situ keratomileusis (LASIK) or photorefractive keratectomy (PRK), patients for several months may experience significant dry eye due to the severing of the corneal nerves during surgery.
6.      Systemic Diseases:  Sjogrens, Blepharitis, Lymphoma, Viral Infections, AIDS …

Dry eye-associated systemic diseases include Sjögren's syndrome, where inflammation of the lacrimal gland leads to tear-production deficiency, and rosacea, which is associated with posterior blepharitis with increased tear evaporation.  Aqueous tear deficiency may develop in systemic pathologies such as lymphoma, sarcoidosis, hemochromatosis, and amyloidosis. Dry eye may likewise develop in patients with systemic viral infections
 and AIDS.  Lacrimal gland swelling, dry eye, and Sjögren’s syndrome have been associated with Epstein-Barr virus infections and decreased tear production, reduced tear volume, and reduced tear lactoferrin concentrations have been seen in patients with hepatitis C. Neuromuscular disorders that affect the patient’s blink (e.g., Parkinson disease, Bell palsy) can lead to dry eye syndrome as can localized findings such as eyelid malposition, lagophthalmos, and blepharitis.  
7.      Cancer Treatments

Radiation, Transplantation, Localized trauma, including orbital surgery, radiation, and injury, may also cause dry eye.
You can see from all the research into the risk factors of DED that we need to go beyond just dispensing some artificial tear to our DED patients.  We need to look into the lifestyle of our patients to insure we address the underlying issues our patients may have.  It is the first step to insure success in DED treatment.


TheraLife Can Help
Theralife Eye 

An alternative is to try an oral system that help your tear glands secret your own tears naturally throughout the day.

TheraLife Eye capsules are formulated to be taken orally. It is unique because it targets tear secretion through intra-cellular mechanisms (internal cell functions). Once the person have been on TheraLife Eye and feel relief, they can also bring the capsules with them when doing outdoors activities being exposed to sun and wind. Simply take a few more capsules in addition to the regular dosage when eyes feel dry again. Usually the relief comes within 20-30 minutes. Give TheraLife Eye a try.

Chronic Dry Eye Bundle
Check out our Discount Bundle Packages
Doctor's Recommended.
80% Success for first time users.
All natural, effective and safe!

Watch a video



Call and talk to a doctor toll free 1-877-917-1989 in United States and Canada
International 650-949-6080

Don't forget to follow us on twitter! and facebook

REFERENCES
  1. American Academy of Ophthalmology Cornea/External Disease Panel. Preferred Practice Pattern® Guidelines. Dry Eye Syndrome. San Francisco, CA: American Academy of Ophthalmology; 2008. 
  2. Moss SE, Klein R, Klein BE. Prevalence of and risk factors for dry eye syndrome. Arch Ophthalmol 2000; 118: 1264-8.
  3. Schaumberg DA, Buring JE, Sullivan DA, et al. Hormone replacement therapy and dry eye syndrome. JAMA 2001; 286: 2114-9.
  4. Lambert DW, Foster CS, Perry HD. Schirmer test after topical anesthesia and the tear meniscus height in normal eyes. Arch Ophthalmol 1979; 97: 1082–1085.
  5. Smith JA, Vitale S, Reed GF, et al. Dry eye signs and symptoms in women with premature ovarian failure. Arch Ophthalmol 2004; 122: 151–156.
  6. Seedor JA, Lamberts D, Bergmann RB, Perry HD. Filamentary keratitis associated with diphenhydramine hydrochloride (Benadryl). Am J Ophthalmol 1986; 101: 376-7.
  7. Bergmann MT, Newman BL, Johnson NC Jr. The effect of a diuretic (hydrochlorothiazide) on tear production in humans. Am J Ophthalmol1985; 99: 473-5.
  8. Schlote T, Kadner G, Frudenthaler N. Marked reduction and distinct pattern of eye blinking in patients with moderately dry eyes during video display terminal use. Graefes Arch Clin Exp Ophthalmol. 2004; 242: 306–312.
  9. Ang RT, Dartt DA, Tsubota K. Dry eye after refractive surgery. Curr Opin Ophthalmol. 2001; 12: 318–322.
  10. Donnenfeld ED, Ehrenhaus M, Solomon R, et al. Effect of hinge width on corneal sensation and dry eye after laser in situ keratomileusis. J Cataract Refract Surg. 2004; 30: 790–797.
  11. Drosos AA, Constantopoulos SH, Psychos D, et al. The forgotten cause of sicca complex; sarcoidosis. J Rheumatol 1989; 16: 1548-51.
  12. Fox RI. Systemic diseases associated with dry eye. Int Ophthalmol Clin1994; 34: 71-87.
  13. Itescu S. Diffuse infiltrative lymphocytosis syndrome in human immunodeficiency virus infection - a Sjogren's-like disease. Rheum Dis Clin North Am 1991; 17: 99-115.
  14. Lucca JA, Farris RL, Bielory L, Caputo AR. Keratoconjunctivitis sicca in male patients infected with human immunodeficiency virus type 1.Ophthalmology 1990; 97: 1008-10.
  15. Merayo-Lloves J, Baltatzis S, Foster CS. Epstein-Barr virus dacryoadenitis resulting in keratoconjunctivitis sicca in a child. Am J Ophthalmol 2001; 132: 922-3.
  16. Siagris D, Pharmakakis N, Christofidou M, et al. Keratoconjunctivitis sicca and chronic HCV infection. Infection 2002; 30: 229-33.
  17. Deuschl G, Goddemeier C. Spontaneous and reflex activity of facial muscles in dystonia, Parkinson's disease, and in normal subjects. J Neurol Neurosurg Psychiatry 1998; 64: 320-4.



Thursday, August 11, 2016

How to Relief Contact Lens Dry Eyes

How To Relief Contact Lens Dry Eyes


Why people like contact lenses?


Contact lenses can provide convenience over eyeglasses for people who are active in sports, look better, and just being cool.

However, wearing contact lenses can cause Dry Eye Syndrome. Some people have worn contact lenses for years and developed dry eyes.  Some have a pre-existing dry eye condition who should never have been prescribed contact lenses.

Contact lens dry eye are due to:

  • Contact lens provide a surface for tear evaporation
  • Eyes not secreting enough tears
  • Tear quality is poor – not thick enough which increase the rate of evaporation.
There are 2 types of contact lenses: Soft and Rigid Gas Permeable Lenses


A. Dry Eyes in Soft Contact Lenses

Soft contact lenses are made from plastics that like water, Sometimes they contain water. In fact, the more water a soft contact lens contains, the more prone it is to losing its water. Therefore, as water evaporates from the front surface of the lens, it absorbs water from your own natural tears, causing you to have dry eye symptoms. Your eyes may feel dry, irritated, tired, red, sandy gritty feeling. Vision often becomes blurry, and sometimes pain.

Most people at this point reaches for artificial tears, or wash their contact lenses several times a day to get rid of the debris (mucous) that forms on the inside of the contact lenses. For some people, using  artificial tears become a routine procedure, sometimes as often as once an hour. But the eyes still feel dry. Soon this condition worsens and wearing contact lenses become unbearable.
Environmental factors may also cause dry eyes such as dry heat from a furnace; an air vent from air conditioner,  near smokers, and wind from being outdoors. However, for long term contact lens wearers, there is another reason for developing dry eyes. The continual rubbing of the lens across the surface of the cornea causing sloughing off of the microscopic hairlike structures that exist on the outermost layer of the cornea to assist in keeping the tear film stable.  Many years of gently chaffing these fine structures can result in poor tear film stability resulting in Dry Eyes.


B. Dry Eye and Rigid Gas Permeable Lenses

Rigid Gas Permeable Lenses usually gives the user more visual acuity. (see sharper images). Rigid Gas Permeable Lenses are manufactured from polymeric materials that are hydrophobic (do not contain any water all). In addition, it tends to repel tear film which is water based. The challenge of Rigid Gas Permeable Contact Lenses is to specially formulate them to enhance their wetting characteristics so that they are compatible with the tear film. Even with these formulations, their surfaces are more prone to drying and creating dry eye symptoms. The problem of mechanically chaffing the fine structures that attract the tear film and make it stable is even greater with Rigid Gas Permeable Lenses because of the stiffness of the lens…it is rigid.

Suggestions to improve Dry Eyes

There are simple things we can do to facilitate the relief of Dry Eyes such as:
  • sit away from an air vent
  • drink at least 8 glasses of water per day
  • exercise
  • wear wrap around sun glasses while outdoors
  • avoid draft and wind
  • go to an eye physician to select a contact lens material that may be more suitable.Doctors sometimes put in a punctal plug in the tear ducts in order to retain more tears. Artificial tears do help temporarily.Prolonged use of artificial tears train the eyes to secret even less tears and the Dry Eye condition worsens.
TheraLife Can Help
Theralife Eye 

An alternative is to try an oral system that help your tear glands secret your own tears naturally throughout the day.

TheraLife Eye capsules are formulated to be taken orally. It is unique because it targets tear secretion through intra-cellular mechanisms (internal cell functions). Once the person have been on TheraLife Eye and feel relief, they can also bring the capsules with them when doing outdoors activities being exposed to sun and wind. Simply take a few more capsules in addition to the regular dosage when eyes feel dry again. Usually the relief comes within 20-30 minutes. Give TheraLife Eye a try.

Chronic Dry Eye Bundle
Check out our Discount Bundle Packages
Doctor's Recommended.
80% Success for first time users.
All natural, effective and safe!

Watch a video



Call and talk to a doctor toll free 1-877-917-1989 in United States and Canada
International 650-949-6080

Don't forget to follow us on twitter! and facebook
Photo courtesy of http://www.ehealthzine.com/