Wednesday, October 31, 2012

Omega 3 Fish Oil Can Reduce Risk of Macular Degeneration

Photo of Macula Hole
Your eyesight is a precious gift that should last a lifetime. Unfortunately, for the seven million people in the United States affected with age-related macular degeneration (AMD), the loss of vision is a very real threat.

Women who regularly consume fish -- a rich source of omega-3 fatty acids -- may reduce their risk of developing age-related macular degeneration (AMD), according to research reported in the Archives of Ophthalmology (Volume 129, page 921).
Researchers analyzed data from 38,022 women without age-related macular degeneration enrolled in the Women's Health Study. At enrollment, participants answered a questionnaire about their eating habits, including their intake of omega-3 fatty acids -- docosahexaenoic acid (DHA) and eicosapentaenoic acid (EPA) -- found in fish.

Over an average of 10 years, 235 cases of age-related macular degeneration were confirmed. Women who consumed the most DHA had a 38 percent lower risk of developing age-related macular degeneration compared with those who consumed the least. Similar results were observed for higher intake of EPA and for higher consumption of both types of fatty acid together.

Eating one or more servings of fish per week was associated with a 42 percent lower risk of age-related macular degeneration when compared with those who ate fish less than once a month. The lower risk appeared to be due primarily to the consumption of canned tuna fish and dark-meat fish, which are high in omega-3 fatty acids.

Take away message. These findings add to a growing body of evidence that omega-3 fatty acids may help prevent age-related macular degeneration. Although it's too early to recommend omega-3s for this reason, it's certainly worth getting more in your diet because of their benefits to your heart.

How TheraLife Can Help


Purified Omega 3 Fish Oil
Molecularly distilled for purity, potency, and effectiveness

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TheraLife MaculaEyeTheraLife MaculaEye

Specially formulated to prevent and stop deterioration of AMD
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Friday, October 19, 2012

How to Prevent Dry Eyes from Cataract Surgery

A cataract is when the lens of the eye becomes cloudy. The lens is responsible for focusing light onto the retina. The reason for cloudiness could be due to protein changes in the lens.

Three (3) million Americans have cataract surgery each year.  The Federal government spending $3.4 billion through Medicare to treat cataracts.1 Recent estimates indicate that approximately 15% of the US population older than age 65 has dry eye.2 "If you assume that two million cataract patients are older than 65, and 15% have dry eye, then approximately 300,000 of the patients who undergo cataract surgery each year will suffer from dry eye."   
This represents 750,000 people worldwide. 

Why Dry Eyes after Cataract surgery?

Since majority of the cataracts occur in people who are over 65, they are also the group that is most prone to have dry eyes due to:
  • Aging. – Dry eye is a common condition for people over 50.
  • Trauma to the cornea during surgery – creating an uneven surface which causes friction when blinking.  Resulting in inflammation and dry eyes.

Preoperative care.

There are 3 important tests to be done to determine if the patient has dry eyes before surgery.
  1. Rose Bengal Staining,
  2. Schirmer’s Test ( or Zone Quick) to measure tear volume,
  3. Tear Breakup Test to measure tear viscosity.
It would be well advised that patients ask for these tests to be done by their eye doctors before making a decision to have cataract surgery.
If dry eyes are detected before surgery, the recommendation is to treat dry eyes and get the cornea into the best condition it can be to minimize dry eye outcome after surgery.

Post Operative Care:

After cataract surgery the signs and symptoms of dry eyes typically get worse. Following surgery, patients are prescribed a number of eye drops, usually a steroid, antibiotic and an NSAID( pain killer) Prolonged use of postoperative medications may be one of the contributing factors of the patient's dry eye symptoms. In patients with OSD, it is best to stop or taper medications when they are no longer needed.

TheraLife Eye can help

Use TheraLife Eye for both pre-operative and post operative care.

The benefits of TheraLife Eye-

  1. Effectively relief dry eyes without the use of eye drops and restore cornea to the best health it can be before surgery.
  2. Post-operatively prevent dry eyes and maintain cornea health through accelerated healing, reduce inflammation, and continue secretion of balanced sustainable tear.
  3. Avoid the use of steroids and side effects.

Testimonial from our customer

Cataract Induced Chronic Dry Eyes- Relief by TheraLife Eye
After cataract surgery in 2007.  I started having problems with dry eyes.  My doctor prescribed several different types of eye drops, but none were effective.  He then put plugs in my tear ducts, and they became infected and must be removed.  He then suggested that I have my tear ducts cauterized- I did not feel comfortable about this permanent procedure.
I then thought about going on the internet and checking what else is available for dry eyes.  Amazon had information on TheraLife Eye that I found the most interesting. I place an order.  Needless to say, I saw a marked improvement and now I am on a maintenance dose of one capsule at breakfast and one at dinner.  2 capsules per day.  I wouldn’t be without TheraLife Eye.
B.G,  Virginia Beach, VA
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1. Cataract statistics. Located at: Accessed 8/1/2012.
2. Nichols KK. Managing surgical patients. Optometric Management. 2010 Sept.
3. Roberts CW, Elie DR. Dry eye symptoms following cataract surgery. Insight 2007; 32: 14-21.
4. Movahedan A, Djalilian AR. Cataract surgery in the face of ocular surface disease. Curr Opin Ophthalmol 2012; 23: 68-82.
5. Luthe R. Dry eye screening and the cataract patient. Ophthalmology Management, Vol 16; May 2012;48-51.
6. Behrens A, Doyle JJ, Stern L, et al. Dysfunctional tear syndrome: a Delphi approach to treatment recommendations. Cornea 2006; 25: 900-907.
7. Sanchez MA, Amiola-Villa Lobos P, Torralo-Jimenez P, et al. The effect of preservative-free HP-Guar on dry eye after phacoemulsification: a flow cytometric study. Eye 2010; 24: 1331-1337.
8. Pflugfelder SC. Anti-inflammatory therapy for dry eye. Am J Ophthalmol 2004; 137: 337-342.
9. Stead RE, Stuart A, Keller J, et al. Reducing the rate of cataract surgery cancellation due to blepharitis. Eye 2010; 24: 742.
10. Speaker MG, Milch FA, Shah MK, et al. The role of external bacterial flora in the pathogenesis of acute post-operative endophthalmitis. Ophthalmology 1991; 98: 639-649.
11. Luchs L. Efficacy of topical azithromycin ophthalmic solution 1% in the treatment of posterior blepharitis. Adv Ther 2008; 25: 858-870.
12. Lindstrom, RL. The effects of blepharitis on ocular surgery. Ocul Surf 2009; 7: 519-520.
13. Cho YK, Kim MS. Dry eye after cataract surgery and associated intraoperative risk factors. Korean J Ophthalmol 2009; 23: 65-73.
14. Moon SW, Yeom DJ, Chung SH. Neurotrophic corneal ulcer development following cataract surgery with a limbal relaxing incision. Korean J Ophthalmol 2011; 25: 210-213.

Thursday, October 4, 2012

Hormone Imbalance and Dry Eyes in Women

Menopause Dry Eye affects more than 60% of the middle age women who are either peri-menopausal, in menopause or postmenopausal.

Hormone imbalance and aging is largely to blame.  Symptoms of menopause hot flashes, insomnia, vaginal dryness, mood swings, fatigue, headaches and dry eyes.  The eyes usually feel dry, itchy, red, irritated and light sensitive.

The most common solution for dry eye remains to be eye drops-, which covers up the symptoms, and over time with frequent usage, the drops wash away the mucin, lipids and proteins that protect the eye.  The eyes become conditioned to secrete less tears and become drier.  Another conventional approach is to block the eyes tear drainage system (punctal plugs) at the lower eyelids or sometimes both lower and upper eyelids.  In some cases, the drainage is permanently cauterized (closed) in order to back up tears to provide comfort.  In some cases, the plugs fall out, and the chances of eye infections increase due to poor drainage.

For moderate to severe dry eyes, very often, a prescription eye drop is prescribed.  When patients have tried all these approaches and their eyes still hurt that is where TheraLife Eye Enhanced can help.

Why TheraLife Enhanced Dry Eye?

TheraLife Eye Enhanced is an all natural botanical product that stimulates the tear glands to secrete sustainable, balanced,  natural tears.  It does so by an intra-cellular mechanism called Mito-Activiation where intracellular activities of the tear glands increase and restore its normal function.  TheraLife has conducted clinical trials in patients with various dry eye and medical conditions with amazing results.  See section below, which describes the TheraLife Eye Enhanced Difference.

Hormone Balance is Vital to Menopausal Dry Eye in Women.

Menopausal dry eye is usually initiated by hormone imbalance.  For this reason, TheraLife sought for a product that will help achieve hormone balance during dry eye therapy in conjunction with TheraLife Eye Enhanced.

TheraLife Eye- Women’s Menopausal Support Formula is formulated to the exacting specifications of certified nutritionists. It contains recommended potencies of key ingredients, Black Cohosh plus soy isoflavones are combined with essential nutrients like calcium, folic acid, and B-vitamins, that have been shown to support normal hormonal levels during menopause. This synergistic blend includes standardized herbal extracts and other nutrients which, together, form a truly well-balanced and effective product for women. an all-natural, herbal supplements made with natural ingredients to provide natural menopause symptom relief including dry eyes.  These work naturally in the body to reduce hot flashes, night sweats, and other menopausal symptoms.

Recommended Dosage TheraLife Eye-  Women’s Menopause Support:
TheraLife recommends 3 capsules/day of the TheraLife Dry Eye- Women’s Menopausal Support formula per day to produce optimum dry eye relief, taken along with TheraLife Eye Enhanced capsules.


TheraLife Eye –Women’s Menopausal Support product has been tested to meet the highest standards. There are no known major side effects from the recommended use of TheraLife Menopausal
Support.  It does not contain artificial dyes, colors, preservatives, flavors, yeast, wheat, gluten, or lactose. Our top priority is our customers' safety and satisfaction.

In addition to TheraLife Eye Enhanced, ThearaLife Eye- Women’s Menopause Support, we also recommend Primrose Oil and Fish Oil.  See section under Total Support for Menopause Dry Eye.
In addition to TheraLife Eye Enhanced, ThearaLife Eye- Women’s Menopause Support, we also recommend Primrose Oil and Fish Oil.

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Tuesday, October 2, 2012

Azithromycin Found To Be More Effective Than Doxycycline In Treating Blepharitis and Meibomian Gland Dysfunction

Azithromycin more effective than Doxycycline for Meibomian Gland Dysfunction and Blepharitis.

Antibiotics are often used systemically to prevent Blepharitis eye infections in dry eye patients.  Blepharitis and Meibomian Gland Dysfunction often go hand in hand.

There are several studies concerning the use of topical azithromycin in ocular surface diseases. . Dr. Gary Foulks and his group at the University of Louisville compared the effectiveness of topical azithromycin versus oral doxycycline therapy in meibomian gland dysfunction and Belpharitis.

Twenty-two subjects were treated with topical azithromucin solution for one month and seven subjects were treated with oral doxycycline for two months. The study concluded that while both topical azithromycin and oral doxycycline improved clinical signs and symptoms of meibomian gland dysfunction, the "response to azithromycin is more rapid and more robust than doxycycline."
Yet another study from the Ohio State University School of Optometry evaluated the efficacy of a four-week treatment with topical 1.0% azithromycin solution versus rewetting drops in patients with contact lens related dry eye. An over two-hour improvement in comfortable contact lens wear time was noted throughout the four-week study period with azithromycin solution use.

Blepharitis being a chronic inflammation of the eye lid goes hand in hand with chronic dry eyes. Here is how TheraLife Eye can help!

How can TheraLife Eye Help?
TheraLife Eye is an all natural oral formula that treats from inside out! It is uniquely formulated to restore normal cell functions to tear secretion glands intra-cellularly for sustainable, long lasting relief. Clinically proven to work for 80% of first time users.

To learn more
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1. Berman BM, Langevin HM, Witt CM, et al. Acupuncture for Chronic Low Back Pain. N Engl J Med 2010; 363:454-461.
2. Cassileth BR, Deng GE, Gomez JE, et al. Complementary therapies and integrative oncology in lung cancer: ACCP evidence-based clinical practice guidelines (2nd ed). Chest 2007;132(3 Suppl):340S-354S.
3. Li S, Yu B, Zhou D, et al. Acupuncture for Attention Deficit Hyperactivity Disorder (ADHD) in children and adolescents. Cochrane Database Syst Rev 2011 Apr 13;4:CD007839.
4. Shaw KS, Bower KS, Mines MJ,et al. Does acupuncture treatment benefit dry eye? Invest Ophthalmol Vis Sci 2011; 52 (6): E-abstract 3839.
5. Hom MM. False staining appearance with lissamine green. Invest Ophthalmol Vis Sci 2011; 52 (6): E-abstract 1968.
6. Ocasio MA, Galor A, Zheng DD, et al. Trends in dry eye medication use and expenditures: Medical expenditure panel survey 2001 - 2006. Invest Ophthalmol Vis Sci 2011; 52 (6): E-abstract 5529.
7. Chi SL, Acquah K, Richard MJ, et al. Relation between punctual plug usage and reimbursement amongst medicare beneficiaries. Invest Ophthalmol Vis Sci 2011; 52 (6): E-abstract 3852.
8. Mudgil P. Effect of hyperosmolarity on the antimicrobial properties of tear proteins. Invest Ophthalmol Vis Sci 2011; 52 (6): E-abstract 1486.
9. Foulks GN, Borchman D, Yappert MC. Comparative effectiveness of azithromycin and doxycycline in therapy of meibomian gland dysfunction. Invest Ophthalmol Vis Sci 2011; 52 (6): E-abstract 3816.
10. Bickle KM, Nichols KK, Haque R, et al. Efficacy of topical azithromycin ophthalmic solution 1.0% in the treatment of contact lens-related dry eye. Invest Ophthalmol Vis Sci 2011; 52 (6): E-abstract 3842.
11. Senba K, Miyamoto T, Eguchi H, et al. The efficacy of oral pilocarpine for the treatment of dry eye symptoms in patients with aqueous tear deficiency and evaporative dry eye. Invest Ophthalmol Vis Sci 2011; 52 (6): E-abstract 3837.
12. Miyamoto T, Eguchi H, Mitamura Y. An original administration of oral pilocarpine (Salagen tablet 5 mg) for dry eye. Invest Ophthalmol Vis Sci 2011; 52 (6): E-abstract 3835.
13. Labbe A, Brasnu E, Van Went C, et al. Tear film osmolarity in patients treated for glaucoma or ocular hypertension. Invest Ophthalmol Vis Sci 2011; 52 (6): E-abstract 218.
14. VanWent C, Alalwani H, Brasnu E, et al. Corneal sensitivity in patients treated for glaucoma or ocular hypertension. Invest Ophthalmol Vis Sci 2011; 52 (6): E-abstract 257.