Wednesday, March 28, 2012

What You Should Know About Watery Eyes/Watery Dry Eyes? Let TheraLife Help!

What  is Watery Eye

Watery eyes occur when there is too much tear production  ( over tear production) or poor drainage of the tear duct.

Major cause of watery eye is Dry Eyes. Treat Dry Eyes with TheraLife Eye and tear over production will stop.  Read On....

Watery eye is the result of irritation or inflammation in or around your eye that causes your eye to increase tear production. One or both of your eyes may become watery. Tears are your eyes’ way of protecting themselves and expelling debris or clearing infections. Watery eye is usually caused by irritation or infection of the eye, injury to the eye from trauma, or a common cold. Other symptoms of eye irritation, including itching, redness, a gritty feeling, and swelling of the eyelids, often accompany watery eyes.

Physical irritants that get in your eye cause watery eye as the body increases tear production to wash away the offending substance, which may be smoke or dust in the air or personal care products such as soap or shampoo. Allergies are a very common cause of watery eyes. An allergy that affects your eyes may be local, such as an allergic reaction to eye makeup, or more generalized, such as hay fever.
Infections or inflammations of the eyelid margin, the area near your eyelashes, are also frequent causes of watery eye. These conditions include blepharitis (inflammation of the eyelid margin), chalazion (inflammation of a blocked oil gland in the eyelid margin), and stye or hordeolum (localized bacterial infection of an oil gland or eyelash follicle in the eyelid margin).

In most cases, watery eye is a result of a mild condition and usually resolves on its own. In rare cases, watery eye can be associated with more serious infections or trauma. Because your eyes and vision are vital to your quality of life, be sure to contact your health care provider if you have any eye symptoms that cause you concern.

Watery Eyes Causes
Tears are necessary for the normal lubrication of the eye and to wash away particles and foreign bodies.

In general, anything that irritates or inflames the surface of your eye can cause watery eye. Increased tear production is part of the body’s natural defense system and serves to wash away irritating substances and infectious agents.

Physical irritants, such as smoke or dust in the air or soap and shampoo in your home, increase tear production. Allergies are another very common cause of watery eyes.

Infections or inflammations of the eyelid margin are also frequent causes of watery eye. These conditions include blepharitis (inflammation of the eyelid margin), chalazion (inflammation of a blocked oil gland in the eyelid margin), and stye or hordeolum (localized bacterial infection of an oil gland or eyelash follicle in the eyelid margin).
  • Dry Eyes- A major cause of watery eyes.  Dry eye causes the eyes to become uncomfortable, which stimulates the body to produce too many tears. In the case of over production of tears, the Reflex Tear  the tear that is stimulated by the brain for you  to cry has taken over in an attempt to lubricate your eyes.  Reflex tear is of poor quality and tend to wash away the natural lubricants that your eyes produce, making your eyes drier and drier.  Key reason is, your lacrimal gland which normally produce tears is not functioning properly.   In order to stop tear over production,  you need to get the lacrimal and meibomian glands both to secrete balanced tears.  TheraLife Eye can help you  balance the normal cell functions of your tear secretion glands and stop tear over production.    It is important that you  test for dry eyes when you have watery eyes.
  • Allergy to mold and dust.
  • Blepharitis- read more about how TheraLife eye can help with Blepharitis and Watery Eyes both.
  • Blockage of the tear duct
  • Conjunctivitis
  • Environmental irritants (smog or chemicals in the air, wind, strong light, blowing dust)
  • Eyelid turning inward or outward- causing constant irritation causing watery eyes
  • Foreign bodies and abrasions- causing both dry eyes and watery eyes
  • Infection- both viral and bacterial which can be treated with antibiotics.
  • Inward-growing eyelashes- causing irritation causing eyes to over water.
  • Irritation from allergens – causing over production of tears and constantly watery eyes.
  • Aging is a major cause of water dry eyes because dry eye is a natural process of aging.
Watery Eye Treatment
  • TheraLife Eye for Watery Dry Eyes caused by Chronic Dry Eyes.
  • Antibiotics
  • Artificial tears- for mild cases.
  • Surgery
  • Topical antihistamines- eye drops
If you might have a blockage of the tear system, your doctor may use a probe to test the tear drainage system. This is painless. If you have a blockage, you may have surgery to correct the problem. Minor surgery can fix improper eyelid position.

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1 comment:

  1. Dry eye syndrome is a major cause of watery eyes. TheraLife Eye restores normal cell functions to tear secretion glands and stop tear over production.