Wednesday, February 18, 2015

How to Prevent Eye Damages from Computers, iPhones, iPads and Mobile Devices.

Vision is the sense most heavily relied on by modern, technological society. Hearing may come in as a close second, but even without a sense of hearing, we could still navigate most electronics. Without our eyes, that becomes a laborious task. But what, exactly, are the screens we look at so much, doing to our eyes?

Blue Light Damages the Retina
Those glowing flat panes, held mere inches from our face, emit a powerful light that can, opticians say, lead to permanent eye damage. Much of the light that comes out of a screen is blue-violet. Studies show that, over time, too much exposure to blue-violet light can injure the retina. Retina damage can lead to macular degeneration, the most common cause of geriatric blindness.

Microwaves
Another source of eye injury is the microwave radiation emitted by cell phones. In an Israeli study, the lenses of calves (which strongly resemble humans) were exposed to the heat and the microwave level emitted by a cell phone. After two weeks, the cells showed signs of damage that limited their ability to focus light. Some had also irreversibly bubbled, a precursor to developing cataracts.

Eye Movement Saccades
A related problem is that when we focus on our screen tiny eye movements called saccades are disrupted.  Saccades deliver refreshed visual information to the brain and blinking momentarily disrupts the saccade.  So, when we need to focus our vision, gazing at our tablet, the blink rate slows so that we can continue the saccades without interruption.  And in turn, when blink rate slows, the protective tear film covering the surface of the eye begins to deteriorate. The tear film not only keeps our eyes moist, but brings nourishment and removes waste.  The end result is dry eye syndrome and red, irritated, tired eyes.

Blink Rate
Not only that, but our blink rate is reduced significantly further contributing to dryness.  Normally we blink about 18 times a minute, but on electronic devices, we blink only about 6 to 9 times a minute or less.

Heavy Usage
The average adult spends seven hours a day in front of a screen, and twenty-somethings check their cell phones about 32 times a day. The technology is too new to know how all that time will add up in later life, when our senses deteriorate anyway. Further research is needed to clarify potential risks.

In the meantime, to be on the safe side, opticians recommend turning down screen brightness and decreasing screen time when possible. Heavy users can also purchase a screen cover to decrease exposure. Avoid staring at a bright screen in dark lighting conditions, such as checking messages on your cell phone in a dark bedroom. Taking breaks, remembering to blink and attention to exercise, diet and proper supplementation can also help to prevent eye damage from screens. Check out our tips for avoiding eyestrain from computers.  These points are also important for all users of mobile devices.  

Rescue your eyes from dry eyes with TheraLife Eye
How can TheraLife Eye Help?
TheraLife Eye is effective in reducing inflammation and stimulates tear flow for chronic dry eye relief. Often people with chronic dry eyes also have Blepharitis. Treating chronic dry eyes reduces the inflammation, and also helps to reduce the recurrence of blepharitis. It is highly recommended that those who have Blepharitis stay on TheraLife Eye long term to increase the rate of success.
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Tuesday, February 10, 2015

Watery Dry Eyes- Stop Tear Overproduction with TheraLife.



Do you have watery eyes?  Looks like you are crying all the time, eyes are sore, red, irritated. 

Doctors tell you to use more eye drops, your eyes are getting worse.

Watery eyes is tear over production or poor drainage of the tear duct.

Major cause of watery eye is Dry Eyes. Treat Dry Eyes with TheraLife Eye and tear over production will stop.  See how TheraLife Eye can help.

Watery eye is the result of irritation or inflammation in or around your eye that causes your eye to increase tear production. One or both of your eyes may become watery. Tears make sure that debris, bacteria are cleared out as to not cause infections.

Watery eye is usually caused by irritation (e.g dry eyes,  cornea abrasion) or eye infection , injury to the eye, or a common cold. Other symptoms of eye irritation, including itching, redness, a gritty feeling, and swelling of the eyelids, often happens in watery eyes.

Watery Eyes Causes
Tears are necessary for the normal lubrication of the eye and to wash away particles and foreign bodies.
  • Dry Eyes- A major cause of watery eyes.  Dry eye causes the eyes to become uncomfortable, which stimulates the body to produce Reflex Tear  the tear that is  you cry with in an attempt to lubricate your eyes.  Reflex tear is of poor quality and tend to wash away the natural lubricants that your eyes produce, making your eyes drier and drier.  Key reason is, your lacrimal gland which normally produce tears is not functioning properly.   In order to stop tear over production,  you need to get the lacrimal and meibomian glands both to secrete balanced tears.  TheraLife Eye can help you  balance the normal cell functions of your tear secretion glands and stop tear over production.    It is important that you  test for dry eyes when you have watery eyes.
  • Allergy to mold and dust.
  • Blepharitis- read more about how TheraLife eye can help with Blepharitis and Watery Eyes both.
  • Blockage of the tear duct
  • Conjunctivitis
  • Aging is a major cause of water dry eyes because dry eye is a natural process of aging.
In order to stop tear over production,  you need to get the lacrimal and meibomian glands both to secrete balanced tears.  TheraLife Eye can help you  balance the normal cell functions of your tear secretion glands and stop tear over production.    It is important that you  test for dry eyes when you have watery eyes.

Watery Eyes Symptoms:

Watery eye may accompany other common symptoms including:
  • Burning feeling in the eyes
  • Crusting of the eyelid margin
  • Discharge from the eyes
  • Gritty feeling
  • Redness of the eyes or eyelids
  • Runny nose (nasal congestion)
  • Sense of a foreign body in the eye
  • Sneezing
  • Swelling of the face
TheraLife Can Help


Consider the cause of the tearing. If the eyes feel dry and burn and then begin to tear,  artificial tears make eyes even drier.   However, if watery eyes persist, frequent use of eye drops are no longer effective.  Try TheraLife Eye which normalize both the lacrimal and meibomian gland functions intra-cellularly.
If the eyes are itchy and uncomfortable, consider allergy as a cause. Over-the-counter antihistamines can be useful. A mucous discharge from the eyes or red eyes may indicate a blocked tear duct or eyelid problem.

Watery Eye Treatment
  • TheraLife Eye for Watery Dry Eyes caused by Chronic Dry Eyes.
  • Start using TheraLife Eye for chronic dry eye treatment and get your tear balanced naturally.
Some steps you can take to prevent dry, itchy, eye irritation include remembering to blink regularly when using your computer and taking occasional breaks to rest your eyes and prevent eye strain. Increase the humidity in your home or work environment if your eyes are dry and irritated. Wear sunglasses to reduce eye irritation from sun and wind exposure, and drink plenty of water to prevent becoming dehydrated and to maintain healthy tearing.


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References
Hurwitz JJ. The lacrimal drainage system. In: Yanoff M, Duker JS, eds. Ophthalmology. 3rd ed. St. Louis, Mo: Mosby Elsevier; 2008:chap 12.
Neil K. Kaneshiro, MD, MHA, Clinical Assistant Professor of Pediatrics, University of Washington School of Medicine. Also reviewed by David Zieve, MD, MHA, Medical Director, A.D.A.M., Inc.
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  16. Sadiq SA; Downes RN. Epiphora: A Quick Fix Eye 1998; 12 (pt 3a):