Thursday, September 22, 2011

How to treat Ocular Allergy, Dry Eyes, avoid Glaucoma with TheraLife Eye

The number of people has allergies or asthma is one in five!
Allergy patients can present themselves with itchy, red, watery and dry eyes. They often complain of having a constant cold.  Chronic dry eye is often associated with ocular allergy.  Want to know what medications are prescribed and how the doctors diagnose ocular allergies and more?  Read on - - - -
Allergy in the United States is very common and is considered a systemic condition that is treatable.  About one third of the patients who has allergies are not aware they have this condition.  Patients who suspect they suffer from allergies usually first visit their family practitioner, who may refer them to an allergist. These patients often end up taking an oral systemic medication, and treatment often leads to chronic dry eye, glaucoma and more eye issues.
Why your allergist and eye doctors should work as a team.
Although allergy also affects the eyes, systemic antihistamines are partially effective at alleviating ocular symptoms (e.g. itching and redness), and they have also been shown to contribute to secondary dry eye problems. Allergists and general practitioners tend to lack slit lamps, which can provide more information regarding ocular health. Optometrists and ophthalmologist are an integral care to both identify and manage ocular surface problems.
Many of your optometrists or ophthalmologists can refer you to an allergist. They should work as an integral team for this wide spread problem.
What kind of symptoms do allergy patients exhibit?
Patients, who have allergies, though don't know it, often have this symptom:
1.      Recurrent cold” that occurs around the same time every year,
2.      Profound Itchy- how this is different than dry eye>
Exhibit a papillary conjunctiva reaction that is not always present in patients who have dry eye – they will complain of profound itching. “You can have some level of itching with dry eye, but its hallmarks are more the foreign body sensation, grittiness, discomfort and reflex tearing. And usually with allergy, there is more redness in the eye.”

3.      Lower lids may reveal dark half circles. This swelling and discoloration is indicative of allergy.

4.      Constantly rubbing nose up and down.

Allergy and Glaucoma:

Allergists are aware that some allergy medications can cause the pupil to dilate and prompt angle-closure attacks in patients who have very narrow angles or undiagnosed angle-closure glaucoma, building up intra-ocular pressure.

Allergy and Chronic Dry Eyes.
Many of these patients and those patients being treated for systemic allergies are at risk for concomitant dry eye, as several OTC drugs contain preservatives that put patients at risk for this condition.  During the patient exam, the eye doctor can be on the lookout for any signs of ocular dryness, via slit lamp exam.
What Prescription Medications are used to treat Allergy?
Intranasal Corticosteroids for Ocular Allergy- Veramust ( GlaxoSmithKline)

Prescription Ocular Allergy Drugs
► Alcaftadine 0.25% (Lastacaft, Allergan) Age of use: two years +, Dosing: q.d.
► Azelastine hydrochloride 0.05% (Optivar, Meda) Age of use: three years +, Dosing: b.i.d.
► Bepotastine besilate 1.5% (Bepreve, ISTA Pharmaceuticals) Age of use: two years, + Dosing: b.i.d.
► Cromolyn sodium 4% (Opticrom, Allergan) Age of use: four years +, Dosing: q.i.d.
► Emedastine difumarate 0.05% (Emadine, Meda) Age of use: three years +, Dosing: q.i.d.
► Epinastine HCI 0.05% (Elestat, Allergan) Age of use: three years +, Dosing: b.i.d.
► Lodoxamide tromethamine 0.1% (Alomide, Alcon) Age of use: two years +, Dosing: q.i.d.
► Loteprednol etabonate 0.2% (Alrex, Bausch + Lomb) Age of use: Safety and effectiveness in children has not been established. Dosing q.i.d.
► Loteprednol etabonate 0.5% (Lotemax, Bausch + Lomb) Age of use: Safety and effectiveness in pediatric patients have not been established. Dosing: q.i.d.
► Nedocromil sodium 2% (Alocril, Allergan) Age of use: three years +, Dosing: b.i.d.
► Olopatadine hydrochloride 0.2% (Pataday, Alcon) Age of use: two years +, Dosing: q.d.
► Olopatadine hydrochloride 0.1% (Patanol, Alcon) Age of use: three years +, Dosing: b.i.d.
► Pemirolast potassium 0.1% (Alamast, Vistakon Pharmaceuticals, LLC) Age of use: three years +, Dosing: q.i.d.

* Be sure to check these drugs for their individual preservative amounts. Which makes dry eye symptoms worse.
1.      Spangler DL, Abelson MB, Ober A, Gomes PJ. Randomized, double-masked comparison of olopatadine ophthalmic solution, mometasone furoate monohydrate nasal spray, and fexofenadine hydrochloride tablets using the conjunctival and nasal allergen challenge models. Clin Ther. 2003 Aug;25(8): 2245-2267.
2. Abelson MB, Welch DL. An evaluation of onset and duration of action of Patanol (olopatadine hydrochloride ophthalmic solution 0.1%) compared to Claritin (loratadine 10 mg) tablets in acute allergic conjunctivitis in the conjunctival allergen challenge model. Acta Ophthalmol Scand Suppl. 2000;(230): 60-63.
3. Ouslter GW, Workman DA, Torkildsen GL. An open-label, investigator masked, crossover study of the ocular drying effects of two antihistamines, topical epinastine and systemic loratadine, in adult volunteers with seasonal allergic conjunctivitis. Clin Ther 2007 Apr;29(4): 611-616.
4. Pew Internet and American Life Project. Fox S. The Social Life of Health Information, 2011. http://pewinternet.org/Reports/2011/Social-Life-of-Health-Info/Summary-of-Findings/Section-2.aspx
5. Stewart MG. Identification and management of undiagnosed allergic rhinitis in adults and children. Clin Exp Allergy 2008;38(5):751-760.
6. Rosenwasser LJ, Mahr T, Abelson MB, et al. A comparison of olopatadine 0.2% ophthalmic solution versus fluticasone furoate nasal spray for the treatment of allergic conjunctivitis. Allergy Asthma Proc. 2008 Nov-Dec;29(6): 644-653.

This article is a short abstract from July issue of Optometric Management.

How TheraLife Eye can help!

TheraLifeâ Eye Enhanced?

TheraLife Eye Enhanced treats both dry eye and ocular allergies.  You are getting 2 benefits in one pill. 
TheraLife Eye is an all-natural botanical product that does not have some of the side effects of anti-histamines (dehydration, dizziness, fatigue and Dry Eyes) or drugs.  TheraLifeâ Eye Enhanced has ingredients that relieve symptoms of Allergy Eyes as well as Dry Eyes.  For more information, see TheraLifeâ Dry Eye at www.theralife.com/enhance.html

1.  Allergy medications- we recommend Claritin – a mast cell stabilizer. 

2.  Use a Hepa filter air cleaner

3. Leave outer clothing and shoes outside before coming into the house to avoid tracking allergens indoors.

DO NOT USE ANTIHISTAMINES – e.g. Benydryl,

For additional information; please visit National Eye Institute:  nei.gov/

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Want to talk to a doctor; call toll free  1-877-917-1989 or email to info@theralife.com

1 comment:

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